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31 DAYS MOTIVATION: You Can Change in 2014

I CAN CHANGEAs you reflect on your goals this January, don’t allow yourself to get overwhelmed with how much you need to do. Set your goals, and then look at the reality if you commit to TRYING to reach them – you CAN, and will, improve. Honestly, that is the worst case scenario. For example…

Goal: I want to lose 50lbs.
Reality: I will feel better even if I lose 25!

Goal: I want to pay off my debt.
Reality: It will be awesome even if I pay off a big chunk!

Goal: I want to read through the Bible.
Reality: I’ll read more than last year just trying!

Goal: I want to be live healthier
Reality: The more I workout and eat healthy, the better I will feel.

Even if you don’t reach all your goals, as long as you commit to trying, you can at least make improvements – and that’s a great thing! Think of the things that will improve if you workout more, eat healthier, drink (alcohol) less, go to church more, spend more time with family, spend less time wasting time, spend less, budget more, work more efficiently, be a better steward of your money, time, home, friends, etc. Just attempting these things will change you if you commit to trying.

This year, instead of focusing on reaching a goal, commit to making healthy changes so you can make improvements. As you begin to improve, you will find more motivation to reach your goals, as your goals get closer and closer. Sure, you will never be perfect – but you sure as heck can be better in 2014! Goodbye 2013, Hello to a better year and a better you!

To improve is to change; to be perfect is to change often. Winston Churchill 

Goal Achieved: Now What?

goal achievedI see a lot of people work SERIOUSLY hard to reach a goal. Then when they reach it, they stop all the good habits they made and revert back to their old ways. I see this in boot camp a lot. People take a 6-week boot camp program, lose body fat, gain muscle, workout on a regular basis and then when it’s over, they never step foot back in a gym ….until the next boot camp. 

That’s not the way fitness works. That’s more like going to the doctor when you get sick. Fitness should not just be about improving your health, but maintaining it. There are goals, and then there should be a new set of goals. Here are Steve’s thoughts this week on what to do after the goal is met so you don’t sabotage your hard work.

Stev Pfiester, Light Heav Weight

Rebound: Return, bounce back, setback, backfire, move backward. 

“I recently took 18 competitors from my gym, Max Fitness, to compete in the NPC Southeast Classic (picture of some of the competitors below). The goal was hitting the stage. Not winning a trophy, but using the stage to make us push harder and be our best.

The goal was made, and the goal was met!  What we do now defines what we learned on our journey to accomplish our goal.  In the “realm” of goal acquisition, focusing solely on the goal can be a tragedy.  What I mean is, the goal is just that: “a goal” – a means to an end.  How we develop, the wisdom we gain, and the way we develop along the way is the real reward for meeting our goal.  Goals are not the …READ MORE

Team max

SCALE: Friend or Foe? 8 Tips to Effective Weigh-Ins

Some people avoid the scale at all cost – especially when they are heavy. It’s kinda like testing yourself in an area you know you are weak in. If you struggle with your weight, most likely, you don’t want to be reminded of how heavy you’ve gotten. However, just because you don’t know your weight doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist – so running from the truth really isn’t the answer in my opinion.

Whether you already jump on the scale or not, here are a few tips to making sure your weigh-ins are effective and helping you move toward your goal.

1. Weigh weekly for more accountability. If you are prone to getting complacent or comfortable at a weight that’s not quite your ideal weight, then weighing yourself can remind you you still have progress to make so you don’t backslide.

2. Weigh on Mondays. Weighing in after the weekend, whether you want to see what the scale says or not, can help you fight the temptation to cheat during the time most people eat the worst, as well as be forced to deal with the repercussions of poor choices we often choose to forget and ignore.

3. Weighing daily can keep you focused. Although our body weight can fluctuate with water retention and intestinal weight, sometimes a false gain can fuel us to push further or not relax on the way to our goal. This is ideal for people who start feeling better and more confident at their lower weight, and are tempted to compromise, and slack a little, before they reach their goal.

4. Weighing monthly tracks progress. Although weighing daily or weekly can help you stay focused and accountable, weighing monthly is the ultimate test. If the scale isn’t moving significantly (minimal of 4-5lbs a month but ideally 8-10lbs a month), then you must respond with an action plan. If you don’t make changes, the scale will not make changes.

5. The scale exposes the truth. How many times have you heard someone say “I know I’m losing weight because my clothes are fitting better”. Although this should happen, and it does time and time again, don’t be that person who uses that as an excuse while the scale doesn’t budge. Although you can gain muscle and lose body fat, eventually weight loss should show up on the scale – and if it doesn’t, you are doing something wrong.

6. The scale requires honesty. First, you need to be honest with yourself and how you will deal with regular weigh-ins. Some people cannot handle the pressure. For some, it discourages them – but is it discouraging because it’s forcing you to face the facts, or is it discouraging because you have unrealistic expectations – or battle with a more serious issue, like a medical disorder? Some people say weighing regularly messes with their mind. Maybe you need your mind messed with, especially if you’ve been running from your weight problem. You can’t make the decision to weigh, or not to weigh, without complete honesty of what is best for you. We are all different and one person’s opinion is not applicable to all people.

7. Weigh purposefully, and only once a day. Don’t jump on the scale every chance you get. Often times people are tempted to get on the scale (out of curiosity) just after they ate a meal or during that time of the month. Duh?! Don’t torture yourself like that. Set boundaries and stick to them. Typically a good rule of thumb is to weigh in the morning, after using the restroom, naked and dry (not after a shower with wet hair). Remember, if you don’t like what the scale says on weigh-in days, because of our body’s tendency to fluctuate naturally, what matters most is what it will say at the end of the month.

8. Have clear and defined goals. Don’t weigh yourself unless you have a very clear objective. Whether you are weighing to prevent weight gain and maintain your weight, or you are weighing to track weight loss. Know your goal and stick to it.

I asked my facebook friends how they weighed in:

 

 

Motivational Mantra to match today’s topic thanks to SinkYourBattleships:

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